Tuesday, August 9, 2016

Pennsylvania SIC Summer 2016 Newsletter

http://www.sfiofpa.org/newsletter.php

Now Available Online:

  • USGBC Announces New Pathway to Encourage Environmentally Responsible Forest Management in LEED
  • PA Approves Sales Tax Exclusion for Logging Equipment
  • New Logger Survey to be Conducted
  • Many Thanks!
  • Family Forest Owners are Key to Future of Penn’s Woods
  • 4-H Forestry Field Day
  • New PA Conservation Explorer

  •  2016 Fall Training Schedule 

Tuesday, June 28, 2016

SFI Unveils the 2016 Progress Report: Linking Future Forests to Communities






The more we appreciate how forests touch each of our lives every day, the more we will make sustainable choices on their behalf. SFI is a non-profit that plays a central role in strengthening the vital links between sustainable forestry, responsible purchasing and thriving communities. 
We are committed to raising awareness that well-managed forests provide numerous benefits that help society at large. These forests store carbon, clean the air we breathe and the water we drink, provide habitat for many species and give us products and jobs - all of which improve our quality of life.

I'm proud to say that our supply chain starts in North America's forests and stretches around the world. Forest products certified to SFI are produced by workers often residing in small rural communities in the United States and Canada and are sold in more than 120 countries, which is why we value our relationship with PEFC.
Thank you to everyone in the SFI community. Together, we are making a difference.

 





Kathy Abusow
President and CEO
Sustainable Forestry Initiative Inc. 



To order copies of the report calendar for your colleagues, stakeholders and customers online at:

Friday, June 3, 2016

Who Owns Nation's Forests, and Why?

http://www.nrs.fs.fed.us/ 
Survey describes values, challenges of largest shareholder in U.S. forests: family forest owners 

NEWTOWN SQUARE, Pa. (June 2, 2016): New research by the USDA Forest Service reveals the motivations, management activities, future plans, and challenges faced by the nearly 11 million families, individuals, trusts, and estates, referred to as family forest owners.  Collectively, family forest ownerships control 286 million acres of forestland, or 36 percent of the nation’s forestland. The federal government is the nation’s second largest forestland owner with 31 percent.
The study, “Family Forest Ownerships of the United States,” is based on responses from over 8,000 randomly selected family forest owners from across the country. The study was recently published in the Journal of Forestry and is available online at: http://www.nrs.fs.fed.us/pubs/50986  
“If we are interested in the future of the forests of the United States, we must be interested in those who own the land and in particular this means family forest owners who own a plurality of this vital resource,” said TonyFerguson, Acting Director of the USDA Forest Service’s Northern Research Station and the ForestProducts Laboratory. “Forest Service research is demonstrating the importance of family forest owners to conservation and providing information that will make programs that serve family forest owners more effective.”
Survey results show that the benefits family forest owners most value are related to the beauty and privacy the forests provide, along with wildlife and nature protection. Financial objectives, such as land investment and timber production, are dominant objectives for far fewer family forest owners. This does not mean they are inactive on their land; nearly half of the timber harvested in the U.S. comes from family forest lands, but only 13 percent of family forest owners have written forest management plans and only 20 percent had received professional forestry advice at the time of the survey. 
“Family forest owners have a great, great love of their land and almost all of them want to do what is right by the land,” according to BrettButler, a research forester with the Forest Service’s ForestInventory & Analysis Program and the study’s lead author. “We hope this work will increase the public’s awareness of the importance of family forest owners and be used to create educational materials and programs that allow landowners to make fully informed decisions to better meet their needs and the needs of future generations.”
With 1 in 5 acres of family forest land owned by people who are at least 75 years or older, and even more acres owned by people who are between 65 and 74 years of age, the question of who will own forests and what they will do with those lands in the future is significant for forest owners as well as land managers and communities.
The study was conducted through the Family Forest Research Center, a joint venture between the USDA Forest Service and the University of Massachusetts Amherst. Co-authors include Jaketon H. Hewes, Brenton J. Dickinson, Kyle Andrejczyk, Sarah M. Butler, and Marla Markowski Lindsay, all of the University of Massachusetts Amherst.
The mission of the Northern Research Station is to improve people’s lives and help sustain the natural resources in the Northeast and Midwest through leading-edge science and effective information delivery.
The mission of the Forest Service, part of the U.S. Department of Agriculture, is to sustain the health, diversity, and productivity of the Nation's forests and grasslands to meet the needs of present and future generations. The agency manages 193 million acres of public land, provides assistance to state and private landowners, and maintains the largest forestry research organization in the world. Public lands the Forest Service manages contribute more than $13 billion to the economy each year through visitor spending alone. Those same lands provide 20 percent of the Nation's clean water supply, a value estimated at $7.2 billion per year. The agency has either a direct or indirect role in stewardship of about 80 percent of the 850 million forested acres within the U.S., of which 100 million acres are urban forests where most Americans live.
#
USDA is an equal opportunity provider and employer. To file a complaint of discrimination, write to USDA, Assistant Secretary for Civil Rights, Office of the Assistant Secretary for Civil Rights, 1400 Independence Avenue, S.W., Stop 9410, Washington, DC 20250-9410, or call toll-free at (866) 632-9992 (English) or (800) 877-8339 (TDD) or (866) 377-8642 (English Federal-relay) or (800) 845-6136 (Spanish Federal-relay).


Jane M. Hodgins
Public Affairs Specialist
Forest Service
Northern Research Station
p: 651-649-5281
c: 651-304-7607
f: 651-649-5256
jmhodgins@fs.fed.us
1992 Folwell Ave.
St. Paul, MN 55108
www.fs.fed.us
Caring for the land and serving people

Wednesday, May 4, 2016

4-H Members Learn and Excel at Wildlife and Forestry at Field Day

The 2016 4-H Wildlife and Forestry Field Day, held at Rock Springs, PA on April 23rd, was another “wild” success! 4-H youth and adults from across the state explored the wildlife and forestry sciences and over 100 individuals participated. The event featured an Exploratory Tract for younger 4-H youth and a Science Tract for teens. The event also included a competitive knowledge and skills test for teens hoping to attend national 4-H competitive events in wildlife and forestry.

The top four winners in forestry judging were 1st Place: Ella Miller (Potter County), 2nd Place: Riley Roslund (Butler Couny), 3rd Place: Hilary Fernandes (Tioga County), and 4th Place: Eva Olufson (Potter County). These top scoring individuals now have the opportunity to represent Pennsylvania at the 2016 National 4-H Forestry Invitational to be held July 31-Aug 4 at Jackson’s Mill 4-H Conference Center in Weston, West Virginia. Participants in both the state and national program must demonstrate their skills in tree measurement, tree identification, insect and disease identification, compass use, topographic map reading, and applied forestry principles.

The top five winners in wildlife science were 1st Place: Laurie Enders (Armstrong County), 2nd Place: Grace Stewart (Cumberland County), 3rd Place: April Flowers (Indiana County), and 4th Place (tied): Natashia Tomes (York County) and 4th Place (tied): Libby Ouellette (York County). These top scoring individuals now have the opportunity to represent Pennsylvania at the 2016 National Wildlife Habitat Evaluation Contest to be held July 24-27 at Canaan Valley, West Virginia. Participants in both the state and national program must demonstrate their knowledge in habitat evaluation, wildlife identification, wildlife management practices and applied wildlife science principles.

Extension Specialist Sanford Smith, Penn State Department of Ecosystem Science and Management, and David Jackson, Penn State Extension Forestry Educator, organized this year’s event. Also assisting was Margaret Brittingham, Penn State professor of Wildlife Sciences, 4-H volunteer leader and professional forester, Ashlee Gulvas, and 15 undergraduate and graduate students from Penn State. The Pennsylvania Sustainable Forestry Initiative (SFI) Implementation Committee and Pennsylvania Forest Products Association helped sponsor this event. 

For more information, contact Sanford Smith at sss5@psu.edu or David Jackson at drj11@psu.edu.

Happy campers at the 2016 4-H Wildlife and Forestry Field Day, held at Rock Springs, PA. The top four winners in the forestry judging were (left to right) 1st Place: Ella Miller (Potter County), 2nd Place: Riley Roslund (Butler County), 3rd Place: Hilary Fernandes (Tioga County), and 4th Place: Eva Olufson (Potter County). These top scoring individuals now have the opportunity to represent Pennsylvania at the 2016 National 4-H Forestry Invitational to be held July 31 - Aug 4 at Jackson's Mill 4-H Conference Center in Weston, West Virginia.

Success at the 2016 4-H Wildlife and Forestry Field Day, held at Rock Springs, PA. The top five winners wildlife science were (left to right) 1st Place: Laurie Enders (Armstrong County), 2nd Place: Grace Stewart (Cumberland County), 3rd Place: April Flowers (Indiana County), and 4th Place (tied): Natashia Tomes (York County) and Libby Ouellette (York County). These top scoring individuals now have the opportunity to represent Pennsylvania at the 2016 National Wildlife Habitat Evaluation Contest to be held July 24-27 at Canaan Valley, West Virginia.

Tuesday, February 2, 2016

Pennsylvania SIC Winter 2016 Newsletter


http://www.sfiofpa.org/newsletter.php
Now Available Online:

  • Pennsylvania Receives 2015 SFI Implementation Committee Achievement Award
  • 2015 Program Highlights
  • ALIFT Helps Injured Loggers
  • Draft Pipeline Infrastructure Task Force Report Gives Consideration to Certified Lands
  • 4(D) Rule Finalized for Northern Long-eared Bats
  • Is Your Logger SFI Trained?
  • New Report Underscores Importance of SFI Logger Training in BMP Implementation

  •  2016 Spring Training Schedule 

Saturday, October 17, 2015

PA SIC Member Paul Lyskava presented with PFA Joseph T. Rothrock Award

Paul A. Lyskava was recognized as the Joseph T. Rothrock Conservationist of the Year at the Pennsylvania Forestry Association’s 129th Annual Meeting at Lancaster, PA on October 17, 2015. The award, a tribute and affirmation of the life and contributions of Dr. Rothrock, recognizes the recipient’s outstanding contributions to the conservation of the Commonwealth’s forest resource. The award citation specifically recognizes Paul’s contribution:

Paul Lyskava continues to be an articulate spokesman for the interests and role of forest industry in the stewardship of Penn’s Woods. Through knowledge based communication, he has earned the respect and confidence of the public, all segments of forestry, the governor’s office and the legislature. In the Rothrock tradition, Paul‘s ability to represent the industry and all forest landowners is very effective.

Paul became the Executive Director of the Hardwood Development Council (HDC) in 1998. Previous to that he had worked as a lobbyist for the Rural Electric Cooperative in Harrisburg. At HDC he provided the leadership to create the “Sustaining Penn’s Wood’s” curriculum for middle and high schools in Pennsylvania. He participated in trade shows in Mexico and Germany, as well as many domestic shows in Atlanta, Anaheim, and Philadelphia. He encouraged the Council to provide key leadership in helping Pennsylvania lumber suppliers to go to China and help PA lumber suppliers find new markets for their hardwood in China and the Pacific Rim nations. In April of 2002, he led the first Forest Stewardship Council-certified mission of PA hardwood suppliers to Great Britain along with the Secretary of the PA Department of Conservation and Natural Resources. He also was the primary contact for Pennsylvania to train pallet manufacturers on the new international regulations for heat treatment or fumigation of hardwood pallets in 2001. He continued as the Executive Director until August of 2002 when he became the Executive Director of the Hardwood Lumber Manufacturers Association (HLMA), which changed their name to the PA Forest Products Association (PFPA) in 2003.

Paul was instrumental in the development of the WoodMobile. He worked long hours developing the exhibit in time for the WoodMobile to be showcased at the 2002 Farm Show and continued to provide important guidance for the program as it grew into a portable museum and interactive educational showcase of Pennsylvania hardwoods by April of 2004. That relationship continued with Paul in his position with PFPA providing key leadership from industry in developing the WoodMobile through the years and he was responsible for the fundraising efforts from PFPA to create WoodMobile Two in 2014 with the grand opening at the 2015 Farm Show.

Paul led PFPA through the toughest economic times the industry has faced and managed to keep PFPA the influential organization that it has become. His ability to lobby for the industry as well as all forest landowners in Pennsylvania is unmatched. Most of the members of legislature as well as the governor and his cabinet know Paul and know that he is the “go to” person whenever there are issues concerning the industry and forest lands of Pennsylvania. Paul has been there to
intercept legislation that would have a detrimental affect not only on industry but forest landowners as well.

Within the Pennsylvania Forestry Association, he led the resurgence of the Log a Load pheasant shoot. Now the shoot is filled up long before the due date and he has gotten many others involved as sponsors of the event. He has also become an avid participant. He has been a supporter for the PFA Conservation Dinner for many years.

Paul has a true passion for what he does and spends a tremendous amount of time at it. He is a devoted husband and father to his wife Kathleen and son Sean. He and Sean enjoy riding bicycle and swimming together whenever possible.

Congratulations to Paul on behalf of the Pennsylvania SFI Implementation Committee!